The myths of Icarus and margin lending

The myths of Icarus and margin lending

    Greek mythology is not everyone’s favourite read but most people remember the story of how Icarus and his father escaped their imprisonment in Crete. 
    Daedalus, the master craftsman, fashioned a pair of wings of wax and feathers for himself and his son. Before taking off from the island, Daedalus warned his son saying “take the middle way, in case the moisture weighs down your wings, if you fly too low, or if you go too high, the sun scorches them. Travel between the extremes”. After he fitted the newly created wings on the boy’s shoulders and giving a never to be repeated kiss to his son, Daedalus flew ahead, anxious for his companion, like a bird, leading fledglings out of a nest, into the empty air. He urged the boy to follow his example but the boy began to delight in his daring flight and abandoning his guide, drawn by desire for the heavens, soared higher. 
    His nearness to the devouring sun softened the fragrant wax that held the wings and the wax melted. He flailed with bare arms, but losing his oar-like wings, could not ride the air. Even as his mouth was crying his father’s name, he vanished into the dark blue sea, the Icarian Sea, called after him.